Sean Smith/JPI Studios

Sean Smith/JPI Studios

As soon as we hit “publish” on our exclusive interview with “The Young and the Restless’” Michael Muhney (Adam Newman) detailing his alter ego’s baby drama, you guys sang “Gimme More” louder than Britney Spears. Well, we heard you, Muhney heard you, and the result is another interview in which the actor delves deeper into Adam’s complicated world. Only this time, he’s revealing upcoming details that will literally — and we truly mean literally — change the canvas of “Y&R” forever!

Sean Smith/JPI Studios

Sean Smith/JPI Studios

Sure, the fact that Chelsea (Melissa Claire Egan) lied about the true paternity of Connor and passed him off as Dylan’s (Steve Burton) son rather than Adam’s son makes the drama brewing in Genoa City a “baby storyline.” But in Muhney’s opinion, it’s much more than that. According to the actor, fatherhood influences Adam in a way that ultimately changes his relationship with Victor (Eric Braeden), meaning it’s a father/son storyline, as well. But even that’s not an apt explanation of the game-changing drama to come.

“What we’re doing now is becoming a part of history,” the actor speculates. “There were critical moments in our show’s history from 10, 15, 20 years ago that changed the tone of the show and made it evolve and [grow up] and find more wings. Over the years, there were those very distinctive moments where it wasn’t the storylines [that caused this]; it was the show itself redefining itself and changing and broadening, and that is what is happening right now. We’re at a critical point in the show, where the whole look of the show is going to become a part of history and things will be talked about. [We’ll be referencing] back to this era for many, many years.”

But what exactly causes this propulsion into a dramatically different Genoa City? To start with, it’s Adam’s reaction to being a father and how the realization changes him as a character — all of which begins in the week ahead. “He’s got some big, powerful decisions to be made, and he will make decisive decisions. Very decisive,” Muhney teases. “He has to weigh the idea of the baby that needs his mother, and the mother that needs her child, and the idea of wanting to take the baby away and saying that Chelsea’s incompetent [because] of the decisions that she’s made up to this point, deceiving people and denying the child his own father, and denying the father his child. He has to ask, ‘Why should her feelings even be considered?’ So those are decisions that are going to be squarely in Adam’s lap.”

Those decisions in and of themselves are going to create a major impact to the canvas, but it’s not just Adam’s dealings with Chelsea that will create long lasting changes to ‘Y&R.’ Muhney reveals that the dramatic scenes to come involving Adam and Victor are the real game changing moments for the show. As the junior mogul embraces fatherhood and all that comes with it, he begins rejecting his dad in what Muhney describes as a powerful coming-of-age story. “He’s realizing that in order to be a good father, he has to be everything that his own father is not,” the actor previews. “He’s having to look at his father as a very, very flawed, cruel man who has played all of his siblings like puppets, caused his own sister to miscarry at her own wedding, just all of awful things that he’s done and the control and manipulative games that he’s played, and how he’s used his children as pawns over the years. So Adam knows that every move that Victor has made are moves that he won’t make, and he’ll do things differently to be a father to his son. And he’s going to tell Victor that to his face and realize what Victor is not and will never be as a human being.”

Yep, you read that correctly: Adam is finally going to stand up to Victor and tell him what a despicable father he’s been. And you can bet that the moment won’t be pretty! “It causes a hell of an explosion between Adam and Victor,” teases Muhney. “Over this next week, a light bulb is going off for Adam, and he’s making his most decisive turn yet. The push and pull between Adam and Victor has, like a rubber band, worn out, and it’s now about to break. That will be the distinctive turn of events in this relationship that Adam has with Victor, where there is no going back.”

In fact, Adam goes so far as to permanently block from Victor from his life! “Victor is full of hot air and empty threats; he’s threatened his son two dozen times since I’ve been on the show, disowning him and walking away and saying ‘You’re not my son,’ and ‘You’re not blood,’ and ‘You’re not family,’ and the interesting thing about Adam is that he’s always hated that about his father,” the actor explains. “But he’s now come to a point where Adam is different, and Adam is stronger than his father, and he’s going to look at his father and say, ‘One time only I’m saying this. I’m not going to do two dozen threats in a row. I’m doing it now, and I’m doing it once. I’m walking away, and I’m showing you what a real man does.’ So he pushes him away, and that’s it. That’s the final note.”

Adam’s bold behavior toward Victor greatly influences their father/son dynamic, and in turn, the entire show. “Adam’s building a wall, and he’s going to show the man what a real final stand looks like,” says Muhney. “I think that’s what he meant in the episode that just aired a few days ago, where he said to his father as he stormed out of the room after having found that he put a bug in his office and he was being tailed. He looked at his father and said, ‘I guarantee you, in the end, I will be the last man standing.’  He understands that generational change, and he understands that the sins of the father don’t necessarily have to become the sins of the son, and that the father goes away over time: He gets marginalized, and he gets weaker and weaker by all of his decisions and his mistakes and the shrapnel of what’s left behind. And then eventually, [the son] will be the last man standing, and he will be the patriarch, and he will be that one that now has his own legacy, his own family, his own children, and… knowing he will be the last man standing gives Adam the strength that he needs to go forward as his own patriarch, as his own leader.”

Sean Smith/JPI Studios

Sean Smith/JPI Studios

That’s not to say the show is casting Victor aside, but is to say that he’ll have a whole new powerhouse of a son to deal with, and it’s not going to be an easy transition! “There’s an interesting maturation that Adam has… and I think it’s going to change the perspective of a large part of the show and the way that we see the Newmans and the Abbotts,” Muhney  previews “There are a lot of nuances and layers and development happening with the next generation of the Abbotts and their interaction with the older generation, and the next generation of the Newmans and their interaction with that older generation, and it’s really becoming a very rich, rich dynamic with the two families. There’s going to be a very old-fashioned and a very beautiful, dramatic, and yet unique and new kind of look to the show that has nothing to do with the show visually, it’s just the dynamic between these people. We see a lot of growing and changing happening.

“There’s going to be an entirely different tune sung by the audience than what we’ve heard sung for the last several years,” he continues. “I can’t predict the future, and it doesn’t mean I’m right, but I feel like we’re at this precipice, and this show has a chance to be great again. And I think it’s going to be. I cannot wait to hear the conversations that are happening online, what critics are saying, what the fans are saying. I’m really excited about it. And that’s the worst part of my job, being patient and waiting on that delay when you’ve read some amazing scripts, and you’ve performed some brilliant scenes with partners that just pulled the best out of you and made those scenes shine, and then you have to wait for two months to see them coming out, and we are now upon that moment.”

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