How WATCH ABC Changes Will Affect Viewing of 'GH,' 'The View' and 'The Chew'; Shows Also on Hulu Plus

How WATCH ABC Changes Will Affect Viewing of ‘GH,’ ‘The View’ and ‘The Chew’; Shows Also on Hulu Plus

 
Topic:
Passions

(SoapOperaNetwork.com) — October 8, 2011 marks the tenth anniversary of Soap Opera Network, an online magazine celebrating the world of soaps past, present and future.

Soap Opera Network began as an online message board on the then popular ezBoard (now called Yuki) platform by two individuals that wanted to start a more industry based discussion forum for fans of the soap opera genre with the idea that not only could one discuss the comings, the goings or the general news of the day, but have the opportunity to learn more about the names, the faces and the minds of the people that help make daily dramatic serials happen year in and year out. At launch, soap operas “All My Children, “As The World Turns,” “The Bold and the Beautiful,” “Days of our Lives,” “General Hospital,” “Guiding Light,” “One Life to Live,” “Passions,” “Port Charles,” and “The Young and the Restless” were on the schedules of television networks ABC, CBS and NBC.

In November 2002, Soap Opera Network left ezBoard and became its own .com service.

Thanks to elaborate databases such as a ratings archive (how soaps rated over the years), episode count archive (who appeared in episodes of a soap opera each and every month and year), its end credit archive (who wrote, directed or produced each episode), including a listing of episode writers and directors along with profile pieces on more than 80% of the writers, producers and directors, Soap Opera Network has cornered the market on information surrounding the inner workings of the soap opera format.

Over the course of its ten years, Soap Opera Network has interviewed a number of daytime’s biggest stars and behind the scenes personnel including Susan Lucci, Erika Slezak, Melody Thomas Scott, Maurice Benard, Steve Burton, Sarah Brown, Hillary B. Smith, Robert S. Woods, Ilene Kristen, Ken Corday, Cameron Mathison, Cady McClain, Eden Riegel, Judith Light, Bradley P. Bell, Brian Frons, Maria Arena Bell, Sherri Shepherd, Daniel Goddard, Greg Meng, Marlene McPherson, Darrell Ray Thomas, Nancy CurleeMelissa Archer, Kristen Alderson, Julie Pinson, Ron Carlivati, Frank Valentini, Linda Dano and many more.

Current Soap Opera Network staff is as follows:

Xavier Toups, Co-Founder
Errol Lewis, Editor in Chief; General Hospital Editor; Days of our Lives Editor
Angela Rosa, Managing Editor; All My Children Editor
Scotty Gore, Managing Editor; One Life to Live Editor
Venus Stone-Cutter, The Young and the Restless Editor
Gehrig Burnett Jr., The Bold and the Beautiful Editor



 

(SoapOperaNetwork.com) — Here is a comparison of the last four cancelled soap operas.

 

Total Viewers Households Women 18-49 Rating Women 18-49 Viewers Final Episode
All My Children

September 19-23, 2011

2,990,000 (+499,000) 2.3/7 (+.4) 1.1/7 (+.3) 689,000 (+157,000) 3,475,000
As The World Turns

September 13-17, 2010

 

2,593,000 (+18,000) 1.9/7 (same) 0.9/6 (same) 610,000 (-10,000) 2,846,000
Guiding Light

September 14-18, 2009

 

2,602,000 (+512,000) 1.9/6 (+.4) 1.0/6 (+.3) 637,000 (+152,000) 2,975,000
Passions

September 3-7, 2007

 

1,645,000 (-22,000) 1.3/4 (same) 1.0/6 (same) 629,000 (-29,000) 1,681,000

Note #1: Comparisons are to the shows penultimate week.

Note #2:  Passions’ numbers are for the final NBC broadcast, not DirectTV.



Aaron Montgomery/JPI

After a week of unconfirmed (by the show) firings of numerous actors, NBC’s “Days of our Lives” has now fired its co-executive producer, Gary Tomlin. The news was first reported by TV Guide Canada‘s Nelson Branco on Twitter. News of Tomlin’s firing comes on the heels of last months firing of head writer Dena Higley and the recent firings of actors Crystal Chappell (Carly Manning), Louise Sorel (Vivian Alamain), Bren Foster (Quinn Hudson), Nadia Bjorlin (Chloe Lane), and Tamara Braun (Taylor Walker).

It was in August 2008 when Executive Producer Ken Corday announced the hiring of Tomlin after confirming the ouster of Ed Scott.

“I have decided that it’s in the best interest of the show’s future to make this change in order to improve ‘Days’ both visually and emotionally,” said Corday at the time. “We at ‘Days’ are grateful to Ed Scott for all of his contributions and amazing energy over the past year. Gary Tomlin brings a long successful history of being an actor’s producer and a writer’s producer to our cast and crew and I know the viewers will see the immediate results of this change for the better.” Unfortunately for Tomlin his services were deemed no longer necessary.

At this time no replacement had been named nor was it clear whether or not Corday would take on all executive producer responsibilities himself.

Prior to joining “DAYS,” Tomlin began his career in daytime in 1973, when he was cast in the contract role of Bruce Carson on “Search for Tomorrow.” He later appeared as Morgan Simpson on NBC’s “Another World” in 1979. From 1980-1981, he was co-head writer of “DAYS” with Michelle Poteet-Lisanti. Later, he went on to co-head write at his old stomping ground, “Another World” for two years starting in 1984. In the late 1980′s/early 1990′s, Tomlin began writing scripts for “Santa Barbara” and directing episodes for both “Another World” and “One Life to Live.” In 1995 he joined “All My Children” as a producer. Upon the debut of NBC’s “Sunset Beach” in 1997 through its last airing in 1999, Tomlin was credited as the shows Executive Producer. He served as a director at NBC’s “Passions” from 2000-2001 and again from April 25, 2003 – April 2, 2008. He joined “One Life to Live” as its Executive Producer in November 2000, but his first credited episodes did not air until January 2001. He left the ABC soap in August 2003. He was immediately replaced by current “One Life” Executive Producer, Frank Valentini. Tomlin won the soap its one and only Outstanding Drama Series Daytime Emmy Award in 2003.

Due to its advanced filming schedule, Tomlin will be credited as EP until episodes scheduled to air in late August/early September.

A “Days of our Lives” representative was unavailable for comment at press time.



Friday, July 31, 2009 2:55 PM PT | By Errol Lewis

(SoapOperaNetwork.com) — Lindsay Hartley (ex-Theresa Lopez-Fitzgerald, “Passions”) has joined the cast of NBC’s “Days of our Lives” in the contract role of Arianna Hernandez. Now Soap Opera Network has your first look at the actress on the set of the drama series along-side co-stars Galen Gering (Rafe Hernandez), Arianna’s brother, and Eric Martsolf (Brady Black), Arianna’s love interest. At this time it is unclear as to when Hartley will mark her debut on the drama series.

{igallery 21}


Discussion: DAYS First Look: Lindsay Hartley on Set


  • Days of our Lives
  • SOAPnet
  • Galen Gering
  • Eric Martsolf
  • Lindsay Hartley
  • DAYS
  • NBC
  • DOOL
  • iTunes
  • Arianna Hughes
  • Rafe Hernandez
  • Brady Black


    TeleNext Media, Inc.

    (SoapOperaNetwork.com) — After 72 years on air between radio and television, CBS’s “Guiding Light” will cease broadcasting on the CBS Television Network due to low ratings. Love may save the world, but apparently it wasn’t enough to save television’s longest running daytime drama. Even with having its name published in the Guinness World Record Book and winning three Daytime Emmy’s for Best Drama Series (the most recent being in 2007), “GL” found itself unable to withstand the mass exodus of viewers from the traditional daytime soap format in recent years.

    Consistently finding itself in the ratings cellar for the past few years, many sensed that the dimming ‘Light” would soon burn out on the long-running daytime drama.

    According to published reports, Proctor & Gamble, the company responsible for producing both “Guiding Light” and sister soap “As the World Turns,” sat down with cast and crew members at their studios in New York and New Jersey on Wednesday morning to break the news that “GL” would be ceasing production this fall, with the last episode airing on Friday, September 18th after more than 15,700 episodes.

    The news was met with mixed emotion by fans and cast alike. Long running “GL” castmember Ron Raines, who portrays the villainous Alan Spaulding stated that the “The numbers are really tough for all these old dramas. I don’t think any of the other shows want any of us to go off. We’re all in this together. What was it? 72 years continuous? That will never be touched. It is a very sad thing, but these are the times we live in. It’s very tough out there.”

    “Being on the air for more than seven decades is truly remarkable, and it will be difficult for all of us at the show to say goodbye,” said Executive Producer Ellen Wheeler. “I’m proud of everything we’ve been able to do, including outstanding storytelling, our community service around the country with ‘Find Your Light’ and the launch of our new production model. This show has such a rich history, wonderful fans, and I’m honored to have been a part of the ‘GL’ legacy.”

    This afternoon’s sudden announcement has sent shockwaves that have reverberated around the nation, as news of “GL’s” demise has dominated media outlets and online soap message boards. Lynn Leahey, Soap Opera Digest editorial director, calls the cancellation “heartbreaking” and said that “it was a constant in people’s lives” that hung around, unlike its prime-time counterparts that came and went. “For many of us, it was the first show we ever watched.”

    Former “GL” Executive Producer Jill Farren Phelps summed up her fondness for the years she spend at the helm of the long-running daytime drama “‘Guiding Light’ has a very special place in my heart. I began my career in daytime there as a production assistant and later returned as executive producer. It was a privilege (both times) to be a part of such a fabulous group of people who did such outstanding work. Some of the most talented actors, writers, and directors have walked through the doors of ‘Guiding Light.’ The industry will mourn the loss of this beloved show, but ‘Guiding Light’ leaves a rich legacy for all of us in daytime to treasure. I wish all my dear friends a gentle landing.”

    Nancy Tellem, President of CBS Paramount Network Television Entertainment Group, had this to say about the the show’s rich legacy, “‘Guiding Light’ has achieved a piece of television history that will never be matched, it has crossed mediums, adapted its stories to decades of social change, and woven its way through generations of audiences like no other. This daytime icon will always be an indelible part of CBS’s history, with a legacy of innovation and reputation for quality and excellence at every step of the way. While its presence will be missed, its contributions will always be celebrated and will never be forgotten.”

    And, according to Barbara Bloom, Senior Vice President of Daytime Programs at CBS, “No show in daytime or prime time, or anytime, has touched so many millions of viewers across so many years as ‘Guiding Light.’ We thank the cast, crew, and producers — past and present — who delivered this entertainment institution, the beloved characters, and the time-honored stories to our audience every day for seven decades. It’s been a privilege to work with such an extraordinarily talented group of people.”

    Adding to “GL’s” woes within the past decade is the fact that several prominent CBS affiliates from around the country have either moved the soap to early morning or late night time slots, or removed it from their programming schedule entirely (such as KOVR-TV in Sacramento, California and WNEW-TV in Flint City, Michigan).

    With sagging ratings, “Guiding Light” began to experiment with several different approaches to the traditional daytime model of storytelling within the past year. The sudser scrapped the familiar three stationary camera set-up in favor of portable cameras, which allowed producers to film cast members in various settings and locations outside the studio. Unfortunately, however, the changes did little to re-energize ‘GL,’ and largely had the opposite effect, resulting in turning off veteran fans and losing such popular cast members such as Beth Elhers and Ricky Paull Goldin (who have since moved on to ABC’s “All My Children”).

    According to CBS, in 2008, the soap “premiered a brand-new daytime production model, featuring permanent sets inside its New York City studio and approximately 20% of the production shot in exterior scenes in the town of Peapack, N.J. In addition, directing and editing were changed to be done digitally and almost simultaneously, giving the sets a more realistic feeling and eliminating the need for production suites.”

    In a press release issued by TeleNext Media, Inc., which oversees production of “GL” for Proctor & Gamble, Senior Vice President and Managing Director Brian T. Cahill thanked fans for their loyalty over the years and said that “We are honored to have been welcomed into the homes of multiple generations of ‘Guiding Light’ viewers. Cahill also gave “GL” fans a glimmer of soap by announcing that he and his staff are “working hard to find the show a new home, and we are exploring all our options to continue to bring loyal fans the characters and stories they love.” That ‘new home’ could come in the form of online episodes or moving ‘GL’ to a cable or satellite network following the soap’s departure from the CBS Daytime schedule this fall. However, given the recent failure of the now-defunct NBC soap “Passions,” which moved to DirecTV near the end of its run after being cancelled by the Peacock Network, the outlook for a new venue for “Guiding Light” appears bleak at best.

    The demise of “Guiding Light” leaves only seven daytime soaps still airing on the Big Three Networks. ABC and CBS will each have three and NBC one. In terms of longevity, fellow P&G soap “As the World Turns” is daytime’s second oldest drama, celebrating its 53rd anniversary on April 2nd. The other six soaps (with the year they premiered in parenthesis) are “General Hospital” (1963), “Days of Our Lives” (1965), “One Life to Live” (1968), “All My Children” (1970), “The Young & the Restless” (1973), and “The Bold & the Beautiful” (1987). “GL” becomes the eighth daytime drama to be cancelled in the past twenty years, placing it with the likes of “Another World,” “Santa Barbara,” “Sunset Beach,” “Loving,” “The City,” “Port Charles,” and “Passions.”

    “Guiding Light” was created nearly seventy-five years ago by the talented soap writer Irna Phillips (1901-1973). Long recognized as a daytime pioneer, Phillips created or co-created nearly a dozen soaps, three of which (“As the World Turns” and “Days of Our Lives,” which she helped Tim and Betty Corday develop) were still on the air at the beginning of 2009. Phillips has either direct or indirect ties to all but one of the eight present daytime dramas. Agnes Nixon (creator of “One Life to Live” and “All My Children”) and William J. Bell, who developed the concepts for “The Young and the Restless” and “The Bold and the Beautiful,” were at one time writers for Phillips on several of her soaps. This leaves “General Hospital” as the only remaining soap not either created by the late soap icon, or one of her protégés. “Guiding Light” paid homage to Phillips in a special 70th anniversary episode in 2007, which featured past and present cast members portraying Phillips, her crew, and some of the original “GL” characters while recording a radio broadcast of the show in the late 1930s.

    Launched as a 15-minute NBC radio serial on January 25, 1937, “Guiding Light” would later make the transition to television, premiering on CBS on June 30th, 1952. The radio broadcast ran concurrently with its TV counterpart (and featured the same actors and characters) before coming to an end in 1956. “GL” first aired in color on September 11th, 1967, and expanded to thirty minutes the following year. In November 1977, it expanded once more, this time to sixty minutes. Ratings peaked in late 1981, but have steadily declined in the years that have followed.

    Set in the fictional town of Springfield and focusing primarily on the Spaulding, Lewis, and Cooper families, “Guiding Light” has won an impressive 69 Daytime Emmy Awards and 12 Soap Opera Digest Awards during the soap’s long, record-setting history. “GL” has also broken ground over the years by tackling numerous controversial issues including teen pregnancy, cancer, alcoholism, sexual harrasement, abuse, Down Syndrome, and post-partum depression. It was also the first daytime drama to prominently feature African-Americans in frontburner storylines in 1966. ‘GL’ became the first soap to podcast audio only episodes in 2005. Veteran cast members include Kim Zimmer, Jordan Clarke, Robert Newman, Michael O’Leary, Grant Alexander, and Tina Sloan. “GL” also boasts a long list of distinguished alumni, including Justin Deas (who is tied with “One Life to Live’s” Erika Slezak and “General Hospital’s Anthony Geary for most Daytime Emmy wins, and remains a part of the cast), Kevin Bacon, Calista Flockhart, Allison Janney, James Earl Jones, Cicely Tyson, Taye Diggs, Hayden Panettiere, and Brittany Snow.

    Originally known as “The Guiding Light” (‘the’ was dropped in 1975), the show focused around the character of the Rev. John Ruthledge, and his parishioners in the Chicago suburb of Five Points (the setting later moved to Selby Flats, before finally settling in Springfield). A continuously lit lamp in the Reverend’s study assured his flock that he was there for them whenever they needed him.

    Even though the ‘Light’ will soon be extinguished, its legacy and rich history will continue to live on in future generations of soap fans. Thank you, “Guiding Light,” for your contributions to the daytime drama, and God speed. You will be missed.

    Stay connected to SON as we continue to follow this story.

    “Guiding Light” airs Weekdays on CBS. Anytime on CBS.com. Check local listings.



    EXCLUSIVE: Soap Opera Network has learned the names of soap opera writers who declared “Financial Core” status to keep on working during the strike. By going “Fi-Core,” these writers can never be members of the WGA again but they continue to pay reduced union dues and the Guild is obligated to continue providing services such health insurance, pension and residuals. Though they can still work on Guild projects, Guild members will not be keen to hire them.

    Here is the list of “Fi-Core” writers:

    • “All My Children”: James Harmon Brown & Barbara Esensten (returned to work in late December)
    • “The Bold and The Beautiful”: Kay Alden
    • “Days Of Our Lives”: Hogan Sheffer (went “Fi-Core” in early January), Meg Kelly (went “Fi-Core” in late November), Victor Gialanella, Mark Christopher Higley
    • “General Hospital”: Garin Wolf (went “Fi-Core” immediately), Michael Conforti
    • “One Life To Live”: Gary Tomlin, Fran Myers, Jeanne Marie Ford, Michelle Poteet Lisanti (all went “Fi-Core” immediately)
    • “Passions”: James E. Reilly, Shawn Morrison, Pete T. Rich (went “Fi-Core” immediately)
    • “The Young and The Restless”: Josh Griffith, Maria Arena Bell, Paula Cwikly (all went “Fi-Core” immediately)

    There are no “Fi-Core” writers at “As The World Turns” and “Guiding Light.”

    At “DAYS” the show decided not to use the services of Hogan Sheffer and Meg Kelly; instead they were paid to stay at home. This signifies that “DAYS” will name a new Head Writer.

    Still at “DAYS,” it is unclear as to whether or not that the fired writers (Tom Casiello, Frederick Johnson, Gordon Rayfield, Judy Tate, Judith Donato, Renee Godelia, Richard Backus) will be returning to the show. More on this story in the upcoming days or weeks.

    Over at “Y&R” there have been rumors and speculation about the departure of Executive Producer and Head Writer Lynn Marie Latham. However, there has been no word if these rumors are true or not.

    UPDATE: April 18, 2008

    The WGA released a letter today naming more writers that I didn’t originally have.

    The list of writers are:

    • “The Bold and The Beautiful”: John F. Smith
    • “Days Of Our Lives”: Dena Higley (went “Fi-Core” just before the strike ended in February)
    • “Passions”: Marlene Clark Poulter, Clem Egan, Darrell Ray Thomas Jr.


    ABC, CBS, and NBC are not in the the mood to show you the fantasy of daytime drama on Christmas day. The networks have decided to ignore it’s female demographic, and go after the men and children in the house courtesy of Christmas specials and sports, sports and more sports.On December 25, Christmas Day in the United States, instead of your daily dose of “All My Children,” “As The World Turns,” “The Bold and the Beautiful,” “Days of our Lives,” “General Hospital,” “Guiding Light,” “One Life To Live,” “Passions” and “The Young and the Restless,” the big-three networks have instead opted to preempt the drama in exchange for Holiday specials and National Ball games. For ABC’s part, the network has also preempted “The View” in order to air the “Walt Disney World Christmas Parade” hosted by “Live with Regis and Kelly” co-hosts Regis Philbin and Kelly Ripa and “American Idol’s’” Ryan Seacrest. It airs from 10:00 AM, EST to 12:00 PM, EST.

    Set to appear are music sensation Beyoncé; recording artist and composer Daniel Powter; acclaimed Italian tenor Andrea Bocelli; Mexican pop group RBD; tween singing sensation Bianca Ryan; Playhouse Disney’s Doodlebops; Disney Channel star Miley Cyrus as Hannah Montana; Disney Channel’s blockbuster “High School Musical” stars Lucas Grabeel, Corbin Bleu, Monique Coleman and Ashley Tisdale; Grammy-Award winner Michael Bolton; pop performers Paris Bennett, Elliott Yamin, Ace Young, and Mandisa; sister act Aly & AJ; Travel Channel Host Samantha Brown; and “Extreme Makeover: Home Edition” designers extraordinaire Ty Pennington, Paige Hemmis and Eduardo Xol.

    Read More >>



    Photo Credit: Chris Haston/NBC

    CBS Corp. and Warner Bros. Television stunned the television industry in late January, when they decided to merge their UPN and WB Television Networks to create a new and improved network called The CW in September. Now, they have stunned the industry yet again with the hiring of former “Passions” star, Justin Hartley (ex-Fox Crane) in the new untitled “Aquaman” project. Hartley replaces Will Toale.”Will is a talented actor with a promising career and we hope to work with him in the future,” a CW spokesman said. “We have made the decision to go in a different direction with the ‘Aquaman’ role and wish him the best of luck in all of his endeavors.”

    According to The Hollywood Reporter, the people from the UPN side of the CW began taking a look at the WB’s pilot development prospects. Additionally, President and CEO of CBS Corp., Leslie Moonves, known for his interest and savvy in pilot casting decisions, weighed in on the matter and recommended that they seek a new star, though Toale was still said to be in the running to keep the role as of last week.

    Joining Hartley will be Ving Rhames as McCaffery and Denise Quinones as Rachel Starling.

    “Aquaman,” a high-profile series in development at the WB before the CW announcement becomes one of few series from the soon-to-be defunct weblets (UPN/WB), that has a chance of landing on the CW. The series takes a modern day look at the DC Comics character.

    Hartley is married to “Passions” actress Lindsay Hartley (Theresa Lopez-Fitzgerald) and the two have a daughter named Isabella.

    A newcomer to the entertainment industry, Hartley joined “Passions” in 2002 as the entitled Fox Crane, who could do everything wrong and get punished for it, as long as he didn’t involve the precious Ethan Crane (played by Eric Martsolf).

    “Smallville” executive producers/showrunners Miles Millar and Alfred Gough penned the script and are executive producing the pilot with Greg Beeman, who is on board to direct.

    The untitled project will find out if it made the cut in the CW’s fall lineup in May during the CW’s presentation of their fall 2006-07 schedule to advertisers and reporters in New York City.



    WireImage

    (SoapOperaNetwork.com) — “Gilmore Girls” bad boy Milo Ventimiglia has joined the cast of NBC”s ratings deprived “American Dreams.” Ventimiglia, who played Jess on the WB drama series, will star alongside former “Guiding Light” actress Brittany Snow (ex-Susan Lemay), who plays Meg Pryor on the series. He will portray her love interest, who is described as a radical high school senior whose family moves in next door to the Pryors.

    In addition to his work on “Gilmore,” the actor was signed on to star in it”s 2003 midseason offshoot tentatively titled “Gilmore Girls: Spin-Off.” More recently the actor appeared in the ABC pilot “Gramercy Park,” which was not picked up by the network. The pilot also starred Travis Schuldt from NBC”s “Passions” and Samaire Armstrong from FOX”s “The O.C.”

    The actor can next be seen in the new Wes Craven feature film as Bo in “Cursed,” which will be released in theaters on October 1. The film is about a serial killer stalking women in Los Angeles, California who finds himself cursed by a craving he cannot define, a change he cannot describe, and by the relentless sounds he hears each night.

    “Cursed” also stars Christina Ricci as Ellie Hudson (“The Opposite of Sex”), Corey Feldman as himself (“Blown Away”), Shannon Elizabeth (“American Pie,” “Scary Movie”) as Becky, Scott Foley (“Scrubs,” “Felicity”), Scott Baio as Himself (“Charles in Charge”) James Brolin (“Pensacola: Wings of Gold,” “Hotel”) and Joshua Jackson (“Dawson”s Creek”) as Jake.

    “Cursed” is being released by Dimension Films, a division of Miramax Film Corp.









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