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Attention fans of CBS Daytime's "The Bold and the Beautiful," "The Young and the Restless," "Let's Make a Deal," "The Talk," and "The Price is Right": If you live in the New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, San Francisco, Baltimore, Boston, Dallas, Denver, Detroit, Miami, Minneapolis, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh or the Sacramento television markets, you currently have no access to CBS programming if you subscribe to Dish Network. You are also missing out on The CW's programming if you live in Atlanta, Detroit, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Sacramento, San Francisco and Seattle. This is the result of a carriage dispute between CBS Corp. -- owner of broadcaster CBS and co-owner of The CW -- and Dish Network that was set to expire on Thursday, December 4. The two sides agreed to extend talks on a new carriage contract beyond the 4:00 PM, PT deadline yesterday. The satellite provider eventually dropped the stations from its programming lineup earlier today when the talks fell through. Also affected by the dispute are three independent stations in Dallas, Los Angeles and New York and two MyNetworkTV affiliates in Boston and Miami.

On the Thursday, April 4 edition of "Dr. Phil," former "All My Children" star J.R. Martinez (Brot Monroe) opens up about the day that changed his life forever - the day the Iraq war hero-turned actor and "Dancing with the Stars" champion suffered smoke inhalation and severe burns to 34 percent of his body after a roadside bomb hit the front tire of his Humvee in the city of Karbala.

For more than 10 years fans of daytime soap operas have been coming to Soap Opera Network to find out how their favorite soap was faring in the weekly ratings report. From time to time we would also provide analysis of how they stacked up when compared to their broadcast counterparts in the talk show and game show genres, but we've never looked at how the broadcast soaps (and to a lesser extent the broadcast talk and game shows) compared to syndicated television. Not that it wasn't easy to provide a comparison, it was just never something we found necessary. In recent months, with the introduction of several syndicated talk shows including "Katie" and "The Steve Harvey Show," which together took over the 3:00 PM slot from "General Hospital" in much of the country this past September after "GH" moved to 2:00 PM, and the second season without "The Oprah Winfrey Show," things have changed. Recently, Broadcasting & Cable came out with a report that showed how syndicated programs might be a solid alternative to our soaps in the key demographics when it comes to Madison Avenue buying advertising time. While we wouldn't want advertisers to give up on our favorite shows, B&C does provide a solid rationalization and even highlights the value of soap operas when it comes to the all important key women demos (Women 18-49, Women 25-54, etc).

Debuting amidst one of the most competitive landscapes in years for syndicated talkers, “Katie” opened as the clear No. 1 freshman daytime talk show, winning all 5 days of its opening week in Homes. On average during the week, “Katie” held wide advantages over its freshman competitors in both Households (2.3/7) and Women 25-54 (1.2/7), including “Steve Harvey” (+64%/+33%), “Jeff Probst” (+188%/140%) and “Ricki Lake” (+229%/+200%).
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